Opinion

Interjection means no peace

Largie

Largie

In March 2011, a civil war began in Syria in an effort to overthrow President Bashar al-Assad and the Ba’ath Party. By June 2013, the reported death toll reached 100,000 – approximately half of those deaths were civilians.

But other nations, including the U.S., did not react to the Syrian Civil War with urgency until last week – when the Syrian government was accused of using chemical weapons to kill protestors and rebels.

Because of this, President Obama and his administration have decided to shoot missiles toward Syria. According to BBC News, the missiles will be shot at Syria from warships or submarines at a far distance. However, no matter how far or where from these missiles are shot, it is still a horrific decision – one that may lead to an even worse aftermath.

Although the U.S. plans on shooting missiles toward Syria, the plan is to maintain limited intervention. But in the past, efforts to keep involvement to a minimum have failed.

During World War I, for example, the U.S. initially opted to practice a policy of isolationism, in which it would refrain from entering alliances, foreign commitments and international affairs. However, after the Germans used unrestricted submarine warfare, the U.S. ultimately played a key role in World War I.

According to officials, the purpose of the missiles is to punish the Syrian government for killing its own people. But the missiles will only add to the casualties in Syria. The goal of peace and a proper society will never be met.

Shooting missiles toward Syria has untold potential negative outcomes. For one, U.S. involvement in Syria’s civil war could cause its allies – Iran, Russia and China – to fight on behalf of Assad. Tension between the U.S. and Syria can also have an impact on the global economy by increasing oil prices.

There’s no need for the U.S. to attack Syria. In the short-term, it will only make the situation worse. A few moments of retribution are not worth years of inescapable war.

 

Christina Largie is a freshman majoring in public relations.

 
September 4, 2013

Reporters

Christina Largie


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

It’s the play Miami Hurricanes fans will never forget — and Florida State fans are trying to forget. ...

Miami Hurricanes fans might recall their favorite college football players in past years dreaming of ...

The new quarterback is usually the ones fans gush over. For the University of Miami, last season it ...

Debate all you want, but University of Miami football coach Mark Richt made it clearer than ever Wed ...

Last year, when University of Miami tailback Mark Walton attended the Atlantic Coast Conference Foot ...

UM dining services team earns national recognition for special event catering. ...

From hammerheads to great whites, University of Miami researcher Neil Hammerschlag is a dedicated sp ...

An ACLU report authored by UM sociologists documents racial and ethnic disparities in Miami-Dade Cou ...

Following the summit between Trump and Putin, reaction from politicians, pundits and former intellig ...

A School of Communication associate professor played an important hand—an artistic one!—in World Cup ...

Miami senior Tyler Gauthier was named to the 2018 Fall Watch List for the Rimington Trophy presented ...

Miami junior wide receiver Ahmmon Richards was among those named to the watch list for the 2018 Bile ...

University of Miami junior running back Travis Homer was named a preseason candidate for the Doak Wa ...

Six former Canes competed on NBA Summer League teams, with three averaging at least 10 points per ga ...

Quick Hits gives University of Miami volleyball fans an opportunity to get to know the new student-a ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.