Opinion

Staff Editorial 4/4: Stigmas stunt healing process

When people get sick, they are advised to go see a doctor. When people want to lose weight, they are advised to go to a gym. However, when people are depressed, they are advised to let it pass.

Society has unfairly stigmatized mental health problems such as depression and anxiety, which leads many college students to feel embarrassed about seeking help.

Experiencing these emotions doesn’t make you crazy. It makes you human. Although college is said to be one of the greatest moments in our lives, many stresses come with the heavy workload and extracurricular activities.

Being depressed is a legitimate mental health problem that many people suffer from. It isn’t a weakness. It isn’t something that goes away on its own, or that your friends can save you from.

Many college students are currently suffering from these mental health problems, but they are scared to tell anyone because of the negativity surrounding the disease. But, help is available.

Psychologists and psychiatrists are the only professionals who can help someone suffering from any form of depression: major depression, dysthymia or bipolar disorder.

If you’re suffering from persistent sadness, feelings of guilt, lack of energy, trouble concentrating, changes in appetite, trouble sleeping or fatigue – you are not alone.

Mental health is just as important as physical health. Individuals need to know themselves enough to realize when something is not right. They also need to know when they’re stretching themselves too thin, which is common in college.

Figure out what you can and cannot handle as an individual. If there comes a point in time where you cannot handle the workload or stress in your life, admit you need help and go get it.

College students need to open up to the idea that depression is a mental health problem that doesn’t need to be hidden. The faster we are willing to accept the legitimacy of depression, the faster we can eliminate the stigma.

We live in a society where going to therapy is looked down upon, but drinking your troubles away or popping pills isn’t. However, talking to a professional can be the safest, and most helpful, form of medicine.

 

Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

April 3, 2013

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The Miami Hurricane


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The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.