Opinion

Dress for success in the classroom

Despite what you are about to read, I promise I am not an annoying goody-goody looking to earn points with anyone. I was not that kid in elementary school that raised her hand when asked who wanted a uniform policy.

I’m just a student with eyes; eyes that often blink in disbelief at the absurd ways people decide to go to class. I’m talking about what they wear or, in many cases, don’t wear.

I can’t possibly be the only person who believes there is an appropriate dress code for class. I thought there was an obvious standard for what is and is not acceptable for school. I guess I was wrong because the things I have seen students wear shock me.

It’s a little awkward for me to sit directly behind a girl with a giant hole in the back of her shirt so her entire bra is exposed. But imagine how the professor must feel, especially if he is a man. He is being put in an extremely uncomfortable situation. There are so many rules he could be found in violation of if he was suspected of even glancing at this girl in the wrong way. To put someone in that position is unfair and, not to mention, distracting.

This is school, not a nightclub. It’s possible to make an impression without looking like you made a circle-shaped mistake while trying to cut the tag off  your shirt.

My question is: Where is the regulation? I understand that everyone has their own style, but are shorts with lack of coverage really a trend?

I’m not advocating for any kind of strict dress code, I’m just pointing out that there is a respect factor that should be obvious but is largely disregarded. Just the other day I saw someone exiting a classroom barefoot. While that may not be provocative, it’s a sign of disrespect. It’s shows you don’t value the class or the instructor.

You would think no one would show up in something so terrible that action needed to be taken, but that’s not true. Some people cross the line, and it’s not right.

The less enforcement there is, the more severe the issue will become.

 

Jen Vogel is a freshman majoring in creative writing.

February 20, 2013

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Jen Vogel


ONE COMMENT ON THIS POST To “Dress for success in the classroom”

  1. Lisa says:

    It’s also extremely distracting to sit behind guys with giant holes in the sides of their shirts exposing everything. Why didnt you mention that?

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