Opinion

Long election cycles delay process

With the 2012 campaign season in full swing, the incessant attack ads about the drawn-out election cycle are picking up. I’m left with one revelation: I’m 18 and have never voted, yet I’m already disenchanted with our political process.

I’m already tired of the endless campaigns focused on personal affairs rather than substantial issues.

Shorter election cycles would be a great first step toward making the process better. While an argument can be made that longer election cycles allow voters to familiarize themselves with the candidates, the truth is that the issues are passed over for personal issues and other sensational stories. This extra campaign time merely leads to distractions from the electoral process.

As an added benefit, some of the less “presidential” candidates (ie. candidates like Bachmann, Cain, Santorum … wait, he’s still running, isn’t he?) would not have the chance to grab the spotlight and focus on their personal agendas rather than what is most important to the nation as a whole.

Also, with shorter election cycles, perhaps the primaries would not be staggered as to give certain states like Iowa and New Hampshire far more influence than they would normally have.

Money’s influence is deeply ingrained in our election process. It might be the most frightening element of modern politics. The ability of large corporations and wealthy individuals to throw their weight behind candidates leads to a conflict of interest. Are the candidates running for the people or are they running to pay back and aid those who helped them get where they are?

Money creates an unfair playing field for smaller, third party candidates, whose views often change the political paradigm even if they will never be elected. The increasing influence of money in politics is lessening the influence of the common people and hurting our democracy.

Paul Levy is a freshman majoring in physics.

March 28, 2012

About Author

Paul Levy


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

And another one... The stars just keep committing. A few hours after Miami Southridge’s nationally h ...

Want an early look at the incoming shooting guard who has a chance to become Miami’s best basketball ...

The University of Miami quarterback corps is deep in numbers but shallow in experience. The battle c ...

Freshmen anyone? Mark Richt sounds like he’s liking these three early-enrollee true freshmen a whole ...

The University of Miami completed Day Three of spring football on Saturday, and as soon as practice ...

More than 250 participants met at the UM Fieldhouse at the Watsco Center to learn more from industry ...

Redshirt freshman diver David Dinsmore won the NCAA national championship in the men’s 10-meter plat ...

UM junior Gina Panarese was surprised on campus Thursday by the Ellen DeGeneres show and asked to pa ...

A conversation with Belén Garijo and Felicia Marie Knaul. ...

Nova Southeastern University’s Jacqueline A. Travisano will be UM’s Executive Vice President for Bus ...

Highlights from the 2016-17 Miami men's basketball season ...

Miami fell to No. 34 University of Louisville, 4-1, Sunday at the Bass-Rudd Tennis Center. ...

Facing its 10th top-30 opponent in 13 matches this season, the No. 37 Miami women's tennis team ...

Junior lefthander Michael Mediavilla was his vintage self, Miami's offense came through again, ...

Miami redshirt freshman David Dinsmore won the NCAA national championship in the men's 10-meter ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly on Thursdays during the regular academic year.