News

Machine at Lowe sells student work

Up-and-coming artists have a unique venue to promote their work – a vending machine at the Lowe Art Museum.

Visitors can purchase a small wooden sculpture, painting or drawing for $5 at the machine, dubbed the Art-o-Mat. Students can now submit work to be considered for the machine. The submission form is available at artomat.org.

The Lowe’s store manager, Lorrie Stassum, is unsure how many art pieces have been sold since it was installed three to four years ago. However Stassum said the machine has been successful.

According to Brian Dursum, the director and chief curator of the Lowe Art Museum, about 65 cents of every $5 spent go to the museum. The remainder goes to the artist and taxes.

“It’s just a fun thing that people like,” he said.

Sophomore Hadley Jordan, a studio art and visual journalism, said that she would be more inclined to contribute her artwork if the profits went to a good cause, such as raising money to promote arts in the public school system.

“If all of the artists are receiving $4.35 for their pieces, that’s not enough to make a difference in their bank account,” she said. “If all the money is pooled in the same place, though, and goes to a good cause, that is a better use of resources and gives more incentive to donate art.”

The Art-o-Mat was first created by Clark Whittington in 1997. Whittington wanted to have a unique, solo art show, and decided to use an empty cigarette machine to create the first ever Art-o-Mat. He never realized his idea would eventually catch on and be used in venues across the nation.

“It just kind of grew and had a life of its own, naturally,” Whittington said.

Student work is on sale in many Art-o-Mat machines. The most active student group is from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln.

“We encourage more and more people to get involved,” Whittington said. “Usually we can find a home for just about anyone’s work.”

Freshman Talia Touboul believes that having artwork in the Art-o-Mat would be a great way to get a student artist’s name out there. However, she sees a drawback.

“Besides Brito and Andy Warhol, mass production of a painting isn’t always the way to go to keep value at its highest,” she said.

March 25, 2012

Reporters

Tiffany Ford


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

It’s the play Miami Hurricanes fans will never forget — and Florida State fans are trying to forget. ...

Miami Hurricanes fans might recall their favorite college football players in past years dreaming of ...

The new quarterback is usually the ones fans gush over. For the University of Miami, last season it ...

Debate all you want, but University of Miami football coach Mark Richt made it clearer than ever Wed ...

Last year, when University of Miami tailback Mark Walton attended the Atlantic Coast Conference Foot ...

UM dining services team earns national recognition for special event catering. ...

From hammerheads to great whites, University of Miami researcher Neil Hammerschlag is a dedicated sp ...

An ACLU report authored by UM sociologists documents racial and ethnic disparities in Miami-Dade Cou ...

Following the summit between Trump and Putin, reaction from politicians, pundits and former intellig ...

A School of Communication associate professor played an important hand—an artistic one!—in World Cup ...

Miami senior Tyler Gauthier was named to the 2018 Fall Watch List for the Rimington Trophy presented ...

Miami junior wide receiver Ahmmon Richards was among those named to the watch list for the 2018 Bile ...

University of Miami junior running back Travis Homer was named a preseason candidate for the Doak Wa ...

Six former Canes competed on NBA Summer League teams, with three averaging at least 10 points per ga ...

Quick Hits gives University of Miami volleyball fans an opportunity to get to know the new student-a ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.