Uncategorized

Cast’s chemistry makes “The Odd Couple” shine

Courtesy Chibiloulou
The Miami Acting Company’s “The Odd Couple” was a wonderful depiction of one of the best comedic plays in American theater.
The Neil Simon play tells of the misadventures of Felix Ungar and Oscar Madison as the two are forced to live together after being left by their wives.
The play begins with Oscar (Joel Kolker), Murray (Leo J. Williams), Roy (Craig Dearr), Speed (Amedeo Falgiatore) and Vinnie (Richard Cifuentes) sitting in Oscar’s apartment during a horribly executed game of poker. The four men worry about the location of their friend Felix (Bill Altfield), who is never late to any of their weekly games.
The show is set on a thrust stage, meaning it extends into the audience. It was interesting to see the play set in this perspective. It worked well with the action of the show since the men often sat around a table or living room to play poker and entertain guests.
Nevertheless, there were some blunders that came along with the thrust perspective. Oscar’s back was turned to the center audience for most of the first scene, which initially made it difficult to connect with his character.
The living room furniture appeared too modern for the decor in the rest of the apartment, causing a disconnect that made it difficult for me to truly immerse myself in the action of the play.
As the play progresses and other characters are introduced, the true nature of Neil Simon’s work is expressed. Altfield had the audience eating out of the palm of his hands from the moment he stepped on stage. His portrayal of a neurotic, neat-freak news writer was extremely accurate. His facial expressions and character choices truly made the character come to life. Likewise, Kolker’s depiction of a sloppy sportswriter who is often late on child support, worked wonderfully as a contrast to Altfield’s work.
The chemistry between the two men, and among the entire cast, was marvelous. By the end of the show, Felix and Oscar’s bickering and fighting truly emulated an old married couple.
Overall, the “Odd Couple” riveted and entertained the audience from beginning to end. It is a great production of one of Neil Simon’s most recognized works and well worth the watch.
February 5, 2012

Reporters

Erika Glass

Multimedia Editor


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Either the Miami Hurricanes get a collective adrenaline rush from heart-palpitating fourth quarters, ...

View photos from the Syracuse at Miami game Saturday, Oct. 21, 2017, at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami G ...

CANESFAN SATISFACTION METER: G6: Time again for the latest installment of the Canesfan Satisfaction ...

Syracuse student writer Matthew Gutierrez of The Daily Orange asked me to answer some of his questio ...

After this past University of Miami football game, coach Mark Richt said the crowd came alive during ...

Univeristy of Miami’s Wynwood Art Gallery holds its annual faculty exhibition featuring thought-prov ...

From a game simulating how whales navigate to a tribute to Ella Fitzgerald, the U showcased some of ...

A new mobile game called Blues and Reds, now available worldwide, aims to help researchers study int ...

A major Lancet Commission report, a three-year project headed by UM’s Professor Felicia Knaul and co ...

With a $6.8 million NIH grant, the UM School of Nursing and Health Studies and FIU Robert Stempel Co ...

Syracuse visits Miami on Saturday, October 21st at Hard Rock Stadium. ...

Thirty years ago, the 1987 Hurricanes achieved perfection. This weekend they are back where it all b ...

As a Hurricane Club member, you are invited to participate in the 25th Annual University of Miami Ha ...

Behind a historic performance from senior Olga Strantzali, the University of Miami volleyball team b ...

The Miami women's tennis team opened play Friday at the ITA Southeast Regional Championships Pr ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.