Opinion

Occupy supporters need clear call to action

Just months after Occupy Wall Street began, the movement has spread to more than 100 U.S. cities and an estimated 1,500 cities worldwide. It is obvious that people are angry, but what exactly are they angry about?

Although the purpose of the movement is to put an end to the corporate greed and corruption that ultimately led to the worst economic recession in history, it has neglected to recognize that there are a multitude of intertwined factors that have led to our current situation.

Yes, corporations that legally yet immorally stole from the American people are largely to blame for our economic woes. But it is equally important to point out additional factors, such as the real estate housing bubble and the European debt crisis as reasons for our dwindling economy.

“We don’t need Wall Street and we don’t need politicians to build a better society,” according to Occupy Wall Street’s website.

Although this is a pleasing thought, the existence of our stock markets and the federal government is absolutely vital to the foundation and growth of our society. Those who criticize politicians for supporting the bank bailout don’t realize that doing so saved our country from a potentially devastating economic depression from which we may have never recovered. Without them, the financial advisors and the politicians, we would be in greater troubles than we are already in.

I am not against the Occupy movement – in fact, I fully support its message and applaud its non-violent, peaceful approach. But until Occupy Wall Street appoints a leader, makes it clear what exactly they are against and creates a distinct, effective call to action, this movement won’t be going anywhere.

Caitlin Driscoll is a sophomore majoring in public relations and political science.

November 30, 2011

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Caitlin Driscoll


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