Edge

The Wynwood Art Fair

The Wynwood Art Fair offered guests a special experience this weekend. While most art fairs are typically rows of tents filled with artists’ recent creations, this new fair was a collaborative effort between artists and visitors, allowing everyone to participate in the art.

Juan Griego’s hugging machine was the first exhibit to greet guests. When visitors walked up and stepped on the pedals, they triggered the arms to embrace them.

“I enjoyed the interactive art because it gave the art a more personal side and heightened the experience for the viewer,” senior Adriana Ferrari said.

Further along, a giant hopscotch board guided people to Niizeki Hiromi’s display, which was one of the most interactive artworks at the fair. As a visitor neared the table, a volunteer instructed them to chew gum and place it on a clear plastic wall. Many people made pictures and words with their piece of gum.

“It was kind of disgusting, but it was awesome,” said freshman Natascha Mijares, who also helped run UM’s exhibit. “I chewed it and made a little stick figure.”

UM’s booth focused on the exposition of the self. Run by the art and art history departments, it sought to combine science with art. They featured three different experiments, including one run by Keith Waddington, who is a professor of biology and an artist.

Using a machine called a Galvanic Skin Response (GSR), participants placed their index and middle finger on it, and watched a video created by the team. The emotional responses were recorded and displayed on a laptop screen.

“What’s better about interactive pieces is that the person who made the art is forced to guide you through it,” Mijares said. “It’s more of a kinesthetic learning experience. It’s more fun for everyone involved”

All proceeds from the art sold at the fair go to the Lotus House Women’s Shelter, a local homeless shelter.

The interactive art managed to draw in guests that were unaware of the fair. UM alumna Allison Friedin pulled over from the highway when she saw people painting on petals, and was able to write her own dreams on the flowers.

“It was well-worth the detour,” Friedin said.

October 23, 2011

Reporters

Olivia Bednarz


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