Opinion

Offshore drilling will not solve oil crisis

It does not take a genius to figure out that we have a fuel crisis on our hands, with gas prices still incredibly high and America still looking for solutions to its energy problems.

One solution is offshore oil drilling, especially on America’s own shores. It should increase our supply of “home-grown” oil and lower the price of gasoline.

Do not be mistaken. This is the most pressing environmental issue on our doorstep, with the Obama administration’s acquiescence to allow some offshore drilling, which had been banned for many years, and Republicans pushing for more.

We know several reasons for why offshore drilling is not the answer, apart from the obvious threat of oil spills like the recent BP disaster.

First of all, gas prices will probably decrease, but not very significantly. Our consumption of oil is so grand that we will only get a new drop of oil rather than a full flood if offshore sites are opened.

Offshore drilling is not going to reduce our dependence on foreign oil significantly. Foreign countries, especially in the Middle East, produce so much oil that they are easy trading partners. With our current energy policy, we will continue to purchase from these countries.

Most importantly, simply opening up offshore sites without finding a long-term energy policy will only stop our bleeding temporarily, which will come back even stronger the next time that an oil crisis hits.

It is time to stop dilly-dallying on a robust energy policy. Past generations have been too lazy and there is no guarantee that future generations will pick up the slack.

We only have the present to make sure that things get done, so let’s get them done.

Gaurav Dhiman is a senior majoring in biology and political science.


October 16, 2011

Reporters

Gaurav Dhiman


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

It's almost summer, time for college football players to wind down and chill out — every now an ...

More than a decade after former University of Miami football star Sean Taylor was murdered during a ...

Lonnie Walker excelled on the court during the NBA Combine in Chicago last week. The potential lotte ...

Athlon Sports released its projections for the 2018 college football season Monday. The predictions ...

Here is some impressive news for the University of Miami football program: All but one of the remain ...

Voters head to the polls in a historic election to choose the country’s next president. ...

From boathouse to marine research powerhouse, the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Scienc ...

A snapshot guide to the start of summer in and around UM. ...

Former investment banker Charmel Maynard leads UM’s investments and treasury functions. ...

Over his more than two decades at the U, the dean of students from 1976-1989 always put students fir ...

For the 16th year in a row, the Miami women's tennis team ended the season ranked in the top 20 ...

Ranked and seeded third, Estela Perez-Somarriba of the Miami women's tennis team tallied a 6-3, ...

The Hurricanes will be in action at the 2018 NCAA East Preliminary, scheduled for May 24-26 at the U ...

Hurricanes' programs post strong APR marks once again. ...

No. 7 seed Hurricanes staged a late comeback to win their opening game at the 2018 ACC Championship, ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.