Opinion

Florida should eat from its own backyard

We eat many different types of food. South Florida has probably one of the best climates in the country for growing just about anything, yet amazingly most of our food comes from almost everywhere except Florida.

Take oranges for example – a state symbol. Much of the orange juice consumed in Miami comes from oranges grown in South America or other regions abroad.

This, to me, is ridiculous. Not only does it seem impractical, but it also affects the environment greatly.

Many other foods, like chicken, apples, pasta and corn, come from other parts of America and many times from abroad. The reason for all this food importation is mostly cost, as it’s somehow cheaper to get oranges from Brazil.

In other parts of the country like the Northeast, it is impossible to grow many types of plants due to unfavorable climates, and in the winter it is impossible to grow anything. To get food from other parts of the country or abroad seems more logical in those areas. Yet Florida has a yearlong growing season.

My main concern with importing food is the huge amount of energy required for transportation. Another problem with importing large quantities of food is that more farmers in Florida lose their profits and their jobs, harming our economy.

The best way to curb this trend is to buy local and support Florida farmers to diversify the types of crops they grow. This helps the environment by limiting the amount of fossil fuels burned through transportation of food. Also, if farmers plant different crops to fill the need of a varied diet, the soil in farming areas will not get degraded.

Buying local food can also cost more. However, in the long run, importing food will cost the environment a lot more.

Nikhil Ghorpade is a sophomore majoring in public relations, and ecosystem science and policy.


October 16, 2011

Reporters

Nikhil Ghorpade


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Here is some impressive news for the University of Miami football program: All but one of the remain ...

Lonnie Walker IV stood out on and off the court at the NBA Draft Combine, which ended on Sunday in C ...

University of Miami incoming prep star Will Mallory, the other half of the soon-to-be No. 1 freshman ...

View photos as Miami Hurricanes Coach Jim Morris ends 41-year career on Saturday, May 19, 2018, at M ...

The sullen, charcoal sky opened with a vengeance Saturday afternoon at Mark Light Field in Coral Gab ...

A snapshot guide to the start of summer in and around UM. ...

Former investment banker Charmel Maynard leads UM’s investments and treasury functions. ...

Over his more than two decades at the U, the dean of students from 1976-1989 always put students fir ...

The final Sea Secrets lecture at the Rosenstiel School examines the biofluorescence of marine organi ...

Maintenance mechanic Milton Davis has kept UM housing humming for decades. ...

No. 7 seed Miami opens its run at the 2018 ACC Baseball Championship Tuesday, May 22 against No. 11 ...

After 25 years, head coach Jim Morris had just one request for the pregame festivities for his final ...

The Miami Hurricanes will kick off their 2018 home schedule at Hard Rock Stadium on Saturday, Sept. ...

Check out over 60 of the top pictures from the Miami women's tennis team's matchup with to ...

In honor of Jim Morris' final regular season game as head coach at Miami on Saturday, May 19, t ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.