Opinion

Living in the dark ages of technology

The other day, someone on Facebook posted that the clicking noise of a classmate texting was getting on their nerves and that they “should have a touch screen by now because it’s 2011!” And that’s the censored version.

Many of that person’s Facebook friends enjoyed the comment, but it made me rather uncomfortable since I have a phone with a keyboard. I then wondered how many people are left in this society without a touch screen. And worse, am I the only one without Internet on my phone?

I remember my first cell phone. It was such a big deal to even have a phone back in 2005. It made phone calls, had a camera and unlimited texting. Then phones received an upgrade in the form of a keyboard. I watched enviously whenever a friend’s phone buzzed and that keyboard slung out to reveal a pad of possibilities.

When I finally got a sliding phone, the smartphone had already been born. A touch screen, Internet, high quality pictures, music, games and more were available on this phone, but at least mine finally had a keyboard.

Now in college, I have truly witnessed the handicap of not having a smartphone. Today, phones let you check the weather, look up train schedules, buy airplane tickets and  check for posts on Blackboard. All of this can be done by touch – no buttons, no joystick, no sliding appendages.

The technology that was once just an “app” in our life has become our main source of entertainment and communication.

One of my professors even requested that we add him on Twitter to keep up with the class and make comments. The transition from MySpace to Facebook took up enough of my time, and now I have to indulge in another networking system?

I have always been behind in getting what’s new, but has this become my downfall? Since convenience is crucial in college, not having such advanced accessories has made college life a bit harder.

But I digress. Although the majority probably has some sort of touch screen or smartphone, I know I’m not alone under this rock that keeps me using last decade’s technology. I just hope I get out soon, because I don’t get good service here.

Alanna Phillips is a freshman majoring in health sciences.

September 25, 2011

Reporters

Alanna Phillips


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