Opinion

Accidents don’t directly give money

There are many misleading personal injury attorney ads (usually seen on daytime television and heard on the radio) that come in multiple variations, but the majority say, “If you’ve been in a car accident, let the law offices of x and y get you the $10,000 you are entitled to!”

The ad makes it sound like all you have to do after an accident is call their office and receive a $10,000 check.

So, what’s really going on?

The $10,000 is a reference to Florida’s no-fault law, which requires every automobile insurance policy issued in Florida to include $10,000 in Personal Injury Protection (PIP) benefits.

What this means is that if you are the name insured (i.e. the person who bought the car insurance policy); a relative of the name insured (that lives in the same household); the person who happened to be driving the covered vehicle (with the permission of the name insured); a passenger in the covered vehicle; or if you were struck by the covered vehicle … your PIP insurance company will pay up to $10,000 for 80 percent of your medical bills, 60 percent of any loss in income and certain death benefits regardless of which driver was at fault in the automobile accident.

Chances are that the $10,000 is going to go to your medical provider. This is a good thing because doctors don’t work for free. But after an accident, they will treat you because they know that your car insurance policy is going to allow them to receive up to $10,000.

So, you don’t actually get a $10,000 check. However, if you sustain a serious injury, you may be entitled to compensation for pain and suffering (which may be more or less than $10,000 depending on the severity of the injury and the apportionment of liability); this is where your personal injury attorney will earn his or her fee.

Jason Neufeld , an alumnus of the University of Miami School of Law, is an associate with Neufeld, Kleinberg & Pinkiert, PA (nkplaw.com). If you would like to speak to an attorney, please call 1-800-379-TEAM (8326) and ask for Jason Neufeld, or email him at jneufeld@nkplaw.com.

September 21, 2011

Reporters

Jason Neufeld

Contributing columnist


ONE COMMENT ON THIS POST To “Accidents don’t directly give money”

Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

No doubt that hurricane season, in all its fury, has released its wrath on South Florida and beyond. ...

Vernon “Vern” Carey, Jr., the consensus No. 1 junior basketball recruit in the nation, paid an unoff ...

LAKE BUENA VISTA — Hurricane Irma gave Mark Walton a chance to be with his 6-month old daughter and ...

LAKE BUENA VISTA —Apparently, University of Miami All-American receiver Ahmmon Richard’s hamstring w ...

University of Miami quarterback Malik Rosier was about to head home to Mobile, Alabama, when the bos ...

UM’s student-run ’Canes Emergency Response Team puts their training into action to assist with recov ...

UM students fan out across South Florida to help local neighborhoods rebound from the impacts of Hur ...

Students living in residential housing are returning to campus and classes with renewed resolve. ...

UM students recount how they rode out the storm called Hurricane Irma. ...

The two year project looks to improve forecast predictions that would look three to four weeks out, ...

Behind a big night from junior outside hitter Kolby Bird, who had tied a career-high with 17 kills, ...

The Canes are back in action for the first time in three weeks. Here are three matchups to watch in ...

The Miami Hurricanes swimming team wrapped up its first day of competition at the All-Florida Invita ...

The University of Miami women's golf team opens its 2017-18 season on Saturday, as it travels t ...

Miami, Auburn, FGCU and Pittsburgh competed, but rain was the victor on the opening day of the Miami ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.