Opinion

Staff Editorial 9/8: Racism continues a decade later

The terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, changed the face of our country and the world as we know it. Ten years have passed, but we’re still feeling the attack’s repercussions, and we’ll continue to feel them for years to come.

The attacks changed our foreign policy for the long term. Domestically, however, it has affected how we treat Muslims daily.

According to a study conducted by Arizona State University and the University of California, Irvine, “It is clear that perceived threat and feelings evoked by the events of 9/11 and memories of those events are related to adults’ political attitudes and attitudes toward minorities and perceived outgroups.”

Also, anyone that’s been to an airport in the last 10 years has heard stories of “suspicious-looking” people being “randomly” chosen to be searched more thoroughly. Many Muslim groups across the world have protested over the years that these “suspicious-looking” people are either of Muslim or Arab descent.

On campus, Muslim students have an undeniable presence; many belong to the Muslim Students Organization and the Islamic Society. Others are members of JAM (Jews and Muslims), a group that advocates peaceful relations between the two religions. Also, there are prayers held every Friday at 1:30 p.m. in the UC ballrooms. The one thing missing is a student center, but that absence is due to a lack of funds.

Yes, UM and the city of Miami are known for its diversity, and we may not notice much blatant racism here. But the two are not a microcosm of the rest of the country, and some communities are banding together against their Muslim residents.

Even in New York City, which is known for its liberal attitude, the New York Police Department reportedly spied on the local Muslim community, including more than 250 mosques and Muslim students groups, the Associated Press reported.

But that begs the question: Where does the line get drawn?

Many people seemingly fail to realize that terrorists attacked our country. They were Muslim, yes, but they attacked because they were terrorists. “Muslim” and “terrorist” are not synonymous.

Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

September 7, 2011

Reporters

Darci Miller

Opinion Editor


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The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.