Opinion

Learning to live in moderation

“It’s just one drink.”

I was just 15 years old when I heard that futile statement. Back then, I wasn’t too strong with the politics of drinking, but I knew it was something I didn’t want to do often. Now I’m forced to confront that sentence once again, but as a young adult who can actually make life-changing decisions.

Though it’s only four words, they pack a punch similar to that shot most college students drink. I knew that coming to Miami meant I’d be tempted by the infamous party scene, but contrary to what most of my friends assume, I did not choose Miami for that reason (I happen to like the fact it’s warm all year round). Drinking terms are somewhat a part of my vocabulary, but only when it comes to sodas and juices.

Though I know that sometime during the course of my college career in Miami I’ll probably have some drinks, I trust myself to keep it in moderation, unlike some notorious party rockers (cough-Amy Winehouse-cough). I’m not trying to land myself in rehab- no, no, no. I don’t think Winehouse only had a problem with alcohol, but a much bigger problem with indulgence and keeping herself in check.

Most of us don’t know when to stop, whether it be with drinking, shopping or even studying. We always want more, until we are passed out on the couch or suffering from a nervous breakdown. We don’t understand the meaning of limitations and allow something as unnecessary as rehab become the new focal point of our lives.

We make these potentially dangerous behaviors become “cool,” even “attractive.” There is nothing wrong with a simple glass of wine, but it’s really taking it too far if all you do is chug a beer every day.

Maybe if Ms. Winehouse learned to keep that first drink in check, she might still be with us today. I hope her sad story helps get out the message that things are better in moderation, and if that doesn’t work for you, there are always sober activities available for anyone who is willing to take advantage of them. For right now, I’ll decline that one drink.

August 24, 2011

Reporters

Krystel Edwards


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • Error

Joseph Yearby declared early for the NFL draft. Gus Edwards transferred to Rutgers. Trayone Gray is ...

He’s all grown up. Yet University of Miami defensive end Scott Patchan is only 20. Two reconstructiv ...

Michael Rumph, former Cane cornerback and current cornerbacks coach, has mentioned, along with every ...

N’Kosi Perry, definitely on the quiet side, met the media for the first time on Monday. He’s the Mia ...

On a day in which University of Miami football coach Mark Richt said veteran quarterbacks Malik Rosi ...

María de Lourdes Dieck-Assad, a world-renowned economist and former ambassador, fills a new role for ...

Through the U Dreamers Grant, DACA students find essential support as they pursue their college degr ...

Former University of Miami Dean of Students William W. ‘Bill’ Sandler, Jr. passed away on August 6 a ...

Researchers use a powerful technique known as Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar to show an in ...

UM’s First Star Academy supports foster care youth. ...

RSS Error: A feed could not be found at http://www.hurricanesports.com/. A feed with an invalid mime type may fall victim to this error, or SimplePie was unable to auto-discover it.. Use force_feed() if you are certain this URL is a real feed.

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly on Thursdays during the regular academic year.