Uncategorized

Simulators transform how students learn

At UM’s School of Nursing and Health Studies, simulation is the way of the future.

Nursing students now have the opportunity to use one of 17 human simulators in order to better practice the theories they learn in the classroom.

Simulators are transforming the way student nurses are trained by allowing them to learn how to catheterize a patient, hook up an IV line, care for a patient with an amputated leg and even help deliver a baby in distress before even going into the clinical setting.

The School of Nursing and Health Studies will soon receive its newest simulator, the Human Patient Simulator (HPS), which can blink, breathe, convulse and go into full cardiac arrest. Among various other unique features, the HPS is the only patient simulator with the ability to provide respiratory gas exchange, anesthesia delivery and full patient monitoring with real physiological clinical monitors.

“We have the technology with our simulation program and HPS to replicate just about anything that can go wrong during patient care,” Jordan Halasz, technical director of simulation services at the School of Nursing and Health Studies, told Heartbeat Magazine.

Other simulators available at the School of Nursing and Health Studies include Sim Man 3G and Baby Hal, an infant patient simulator. Sim Man, for instance, can breathe, cry, sweat, register a pulse, catch a cold, and bleed. Two of the school’s other simulators are able to give birth to babies that can coo, turn blue or exhibit a host of other emotions.

This is a valuable experience for nursing students because it prevents inadequate training, which is recognized as one of the contributing factors to why medial errors occur. According to the ground breaking report “To Err is Human” by the Institute of Medicine in 1999, 98,000 Americans die each year from medical factors; 70 percent of these errors can be attributed to “human factors.” Using simulators allows educators to identify potential training issues in the lab before students ever provide actual patient care.

Through simulation, students can quickly learn from their errors without first harming a real patient. Training sessions are videotaped and observed by instructors and other students in a separate room to aid the teaching process. Then, teams are debriefed after their shifts end in order to learn what they did wrong and where they can improve.

“We allow students to make the errors in the lab and make certain they learn from their mistakes,” Halasz said. “The bottom line is utilizing education to reduce medical errors and save lives.”

June 14, 2011

Authors

Alexa Lopez

Editor-in-chief


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

The Miami Hurricanes are 2-0 when these two things happen: Michael Mediavilla starts, and Michael Bu ...

If Miami Hurricanes fans were hoping to hear that one quarterback charged forward with such authorit ...

The Florida State Seminoles came through in the clutch. The Miami Hurricanes did not. That pretty mu ...

The Jerry’s Pizza of Mark Richt’s youth is gone, but Fran’s Chicken Haven — “If the Colonel had our ...

Hey, Hurricane basketball fans, do you ever sit around and wonder whatever happened to Guillermo Dia ...

UM students, staff and faculty join the worldwide march to end men’s violence against women. ...

Greek Week at the University of Miami is committed to raising money and awareness for United Cerebra ...

Carlos Bustamante, a Presidential Distinguished Scholar, kicked off his series of lectures about gen ...

Edward Abraham, M.D., has been named Dean of the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Med ...

Junior Kristiana Yao is the first named at UM in the last 33 years. ...

The University of Miami men's tennis team is set to play its final match of the regular season ...

Ebony Morrison & women's 4x100m won at Baylor, while Gabrielle Hesslau & Sean Grossman ...

Sunday's finale between the Miami Hurricanes and Florida State Seminoles (April 23) will be pla ...

The No. 39 Miami women's tennis team will play its final match of the regular season Sunday at ...

On a night when he connected for a grand slam against archrival Florida State in front of a sold-out ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly on Thursdays during the regular academic year.