News

Research island acquired in Florida Keys

Courtesy Evan D'Alessandro

The University of Miami’s footprint in South Florida is expanding with the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science’s (RSMAS) acquisition of  a 63-acre research island in the northern Keys.

The Broad Key research station, which includes a five-bedroom house, will be used as a research and education facility for scientists and students, providing direct access to Florida’s sub-tropical marine ecosystem.

“I want this to be a facility where educators and researchers can go and be really comfortable,” said Evan D’Alessandro, a visiting assistant professor for the division of marine biology and fisheries, who is overseeing and managing Broad Key operations. “The facility will have the amenities of home, but also the laboratory and field support that they need to do their work.”

Roni Avissar, dean of the RSMAS, said Broad Key will be an advantage for the university and for scientists.

“The use of Broad Key is going to provide our renowned marine and climate scientists with an ideal platform from which to launch field courses that will help us to better understand Florida’s complex marine ecosystems,” he said.

Native species to Broad Key include cardinals, finches, herons, ibis and osprey, as well as bonefish, sharks and lobster in the water surrounding the island.

“The rest of the 63 acres is low-lying mangrove forest,” D’Alessandro said. “This is an ideal location for people doing mangrove research.

Chris Langdon, who holds a doctorate in biological oceanography, is an associate professor in the marine biology and fisheries division at RSMAS.

“I would love to take a class out for a research weekend and nighttime dive, which doesn’t happen regularly,” Langdon said.

A weather station, atmospheric sensing system and a water sampling system will also be added to Broad Key in the future. These technologies will provide a continuous time series of data for researchers.

“I hope this is a place that people look forward to coming back to, not a place they have to endure to get through their work,” D’Alessandro said.

Nick Bissel may be contacted at nbissel@themiamihurricane.com.

April 7, 2011

Reporters

Nick Bissel

Contributing News Writer


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

After this past University of Miami football game, coach Mark Richt said the crowd came alive during ...

The attorneys for University of Miami men’s basketball coach Jim Larrañaga expect indictments to be ...

Few could have imagined this scenario coming into Saturday’s University of Miami football game at ho ...

Alex Cora’s success hasn’t surprised Miami Hurricanes baseball coach Jim Morris. Cora, according to ...

A six-pack of Canes notes on a Thursday: • Defensive coordinator Manny Diaz has an interesting theor ...

Univeristy of Miami’s Wynwood Art Gallery holds its annual faculty exhibition featuring thought-prov ...

From a game simulating how whales navigate to a tribute to Ella Fitzgerald, the U showcased some of ...

A new mobile game called Blues and Reds, now available worldwide, aims to help researchers study int ...

A major Lancet Commission report, a three-year project headed by UM’s Professor Felicia Knaul and co ...

With a $6.8 million NIH grant, the UM School of Nursing and Health Studies and FIU Robert Stempel Co ...

Syracuse visits Miami on Saturday, October 21st at Hard Rock Stadium. ...

Thirty years ago, the 1987 Hurricanes achieved perfection. This weekend they are back where it all b ...

As a Hurricane Club member, you are invited to participate in the 25th Annual University of Miami Ha ...

Behind a historic performance from senior Olga Strantzali, the University of Miami volleyball team b ...

The Miami women's tennis team opened play Friday at the ITA Southeast Regional Championships Pr ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.