Opinion

Don’t break an ankle running

I like where this article is going in theory but in practice not so much, and I’m referring to ‘Force Yourself to Run the Extra Mile [academically].’

There are some classes that are deemed easy but can just as easily be more stimulating and rigorous if you want to actually read up on the extra material, but come on? Actively mandating more on your plate? Read another chapter or two not on the syllabus and on your accord but don’t make us all suffer. Why read on ratemyprofessors: “This lady was horrible and narcissistic” and decide, “oh I’m going to sign up for that one, that sounds like fun”?

Challenge yourself as much as you’d like, academically and otherwise, but if you have to be bound to a challenge to feel good about the tuition fees and these ‘scary’ surveys, which certainly have some significance, then you are only fooling yourself and sadistic as well. But the question these stats are really stirring is: why do students seek out easier courses often times if given the opportunity? The problem is you either have an easy and relaxed but still competent professor teach a class and you can feel like you’re in a good environment, or with a bad apple, it can be frustratingly difficult and you feel like you’re in the death chair. In most instances, there is no middle ground between these two extremes.

So take your pick and if you’re rational, you would choose the lesser of two evils. Also, if you’re seeking grad school, or you just want to find a job after you graduate (I know grades are ‘not as important as people think,’ but a sub par GPA would make you stand out negatively), what’s wrong in choosing the easier way but only by negating the chance to leave your future up to fate.

By the same irrational logic of one seeking difficult classes that usually are accommodated by notorious reputations, you would suggest, “that spinning class should be longer, I want to feel the lactic acid burn more” when you could just as easily stay behind and keep going if you pleased instead of hearing all the others aching and suffering as it went on.

Evan Seaman is a senior majoring in marketing. He may be contacted at eseaman@themiamihurricane.com.

March 30, 2011

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Evan Seaman

Contributing Columnist


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