Opinion

International aid, support to Japan lags

Giving was at its peak in the first days following the catastrophic earthquake and tsunami in Japan. But the donations have been lagging compared to other natural disasters such as the Haiti earthquake and Hurricane Katrina.

According to The Washington Post, the American Red Cross has raised $47 million for victims in Japan as of last Wednesday, whereas after the same amount of time following the Haiti earthquake it had raised $92.3 million.

Last Tuesday, President Donna E. Shalala sent out an e-mail to the University of Miami community informing students of this calamity and the University’s response. Unfortunately, no one yet has organized a fundraiser to assist those who are suffering from this crisis.

In contrast, students, faculty and staff from the Miller School of Medicine, School of Architecture and School of Communication all contributed positively to Haiti and have not forgotten their commitment to reconstructing Haiti. As a developing country, it suffers from poverty and a poor infrastructure. Because their needs were obvious since day one, the catastrophe pushed many around the world to become activists. Haiti is close to the United States and was a poverty-stricken country before the earthquake hit.

Japan, however, is an industrialized country with a strong government and has the third largest economy in the world. With that said, not only have many non-profit organizations stepped back from fundraising for Japan, but people have expressed little interest in this national disaster. Japan is still in need of the basics: shelter, water, food, medical aid, clothes and more. If the majority of people adopt this outlook, then where is the international aid and support?

Regardless of how industrialized a country is, we think that the university should still raise awareness and help alleviate the suffering in Japan. Just as our school responded to Haiti’s tragedy last year, we should do the same for Japan.

Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

March 24, 2011

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Gino DiMare on Tuesday stood in a spot that two men before him had crafted into a pinnacle of succes ...

The NBA Draft is on Thursday, and the buzz around the league is that the University of Miami’s Lonni ...

Former NFL and University of Miami star Kellen Winslow Jr. was arrested Thursday for numerous allege ...

Trevor Darling's perseverance paid off. After not being selected in the NFL Draft, the former U ...

Father's Day has never been a big holiday in the Larranaga household because basketball always ...

Teachers tackle challenging questions at the Holocaust Studies Summer Institute. ...

A University of Miami lecturer explores the role of the front porch in black communities. ...

In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, two public health sciences students traveled to Puerto Rico to ...

Colder Atlantic temperatures could change hurricane season forecasts, but the trend isn't expec ...

UM neurorehabilitation expert David S. Kushner, M.D., who helps modern patients recover from brain s ...

Gino DiMare was officially introduced as the 10th head baseball coach in program history Tuesday in ...

Jaquan Johnson was named to Athlon Sports' Preseason All-America First Team, while Shaq Quarter ...

An outstanding showing at the USATF Championships earned Symone Mason a trip to the World U20 Champi ...

UM alum returns to lead Canes' MBB strength and conditioning efforts. ...

Amy Deem was recognized for the third time as the ACC Women's Outdoor Track and Field Coach of ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.