Edge

“Love and Other Drugs” compelling but falters at end

The humor of “Love and Other Drugs” is subversive and complex, its characters believable and its plot compelling. Unfortunately, it all goes to hell in the last few minutes, when characters seemingly undergo lobotomies and become totally different people. At least the soundtrack is incredible.

It’s a shame that such a good, truly funny movie completely loses its footing in the final scenes. “Love and Other Drugs” abandons its tried-and-true formula of being funny without resorting to gross-out humor and becomes almost unbearably sappy, its protagonists spouting clichéd declarations of love that would seem out of place even in a Taylor Swift song.

Therefore, the film– based on Jamie Reidy’s memoir “Hard Sell: The Evolution of a Viagra Salesman”–  is lucky that it has such a charismatic leading man in Jake Gyllenhaal, who manages to be funny in the role of Jamie, a professionally and sexually aggressive pharmaceutical salesman. Anne Hathaway tries a bit too hard as Maggie, the quintessential free spirit. Their chemistry is palpable and their relationship seems genuine until the film’s last few minutes, in which all previously established characterization is ignored in favor of a disappointingly saccharine ending.

Luckily, “Love and Other Drugs” has other actors who more than compensate for the film’s inconsistent ending. Oliver Platt and Hank Azaria are absolutely hilarious, and while Judy Greer more or less plays herself, she does it well. The film, set in 1996, is also notable for its apparent use of a checklist of 90s clichés: boomboxes, overalls, pagers and enormous cell phones are all featured prominently, at times feeling like an episode of “I Love the 90s.”

“Love and Other Drugs” is enthralling if a bit hackneyed, and if a loved one has ever been affected by a degenerative disease, it will hit uncomfortably close to home. Just do yourself a favor and ignore the overly sentimental ending.

Sarah B. Pilchick may be contacted at sbpilchick@themiamihurricane.com.

Rating: 2.5/4 stars

Starring: Jake Gyllenhaal, Anne Hathaway

Directed By: Edward Zwick

MPAA Rating: R

November 21, 2010

Reporters

Sarah B. Pilchick

Senior EDGE Writer


ONE COMMENT ON THIS POST To ““Love and Other Drugs” compelling but falters at end”

Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

The University of Miami football team has another player with a season-ending injury — and this one ...

University of Miami men’s basketball coach Jim Larrañaga received a grand jury subpoena for his phon ...

Get ready for an avalanche of University of Miami defensive backs and linemen descending on the Hard ...

When UM coach Mark Richt summoned quarterback Malik Rosier into his office last year, a few months a ...

Quarterback Malik Rosier of the No. 8-ranked Miami Hurricanes maintains a solid third place in what ...

Univeristy of Miami’s Wynwood Art Gallery holds its annual faculty exhibition featuring thought-prov ...

From a game simulating how whales navigate to a tribute to Ella Fitzgerald, the U showcased some of ...

A new mobile game called Blues and Reds, now available worldwide, aims to help researchers study int ...

A major Lancet Commission report, a three-year project headed by UM’s Professor Felicia Knaul and co ...

With a $6.8 million NIH grant, the UM School of Nursing and Health Studies and FIU Robert Stempel Co ...

The Hurricanes will look to slow down an inspired Syracuse team at Hard Rock Stadium on Saturday. ...

As a Hurricane Club member, you are invited to participate in the 25th Annual University of Miami Ha ...

University of Miami head coach Mark Richt was selected to the 20-member Paul "Bear" Bryant ...

University of Miami sophomore Bruce Brown Jr. was among 21 players named to the watch list for the 2 ...

Head coach Katie Meier and senior forward/center Erykah Davenport will represent Miami Thursday at t ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.