Opinion

Costumes: from Disney to freaky

Remember when Halloween was a time we begged our moms for the latest super hero or Disney princess costume, and we dreamt of hayrides, haunted houses, and the candy we would score? Ah, those were the good old days.

Now on college campuses across the country, Halloween is a special time of year when some let their freak flags fly. And by freak flag, I don’t mean their supernatural selves, I mean freak-ay… Flavor of Love, Jersey Shore, knock-down drag-out ho-selves.

Every year we see women in “dirty French maid” or “hot little devil” costumes. But showing up in pasties, a thong and mouse ears does not make you “Minnie Mouse.” Nor does wearing white tape over strategic body parts make you a zombie. I had no idea that “Finding Nemo” was a pulse-raising character, but some costume sites beg to differ.

Oh and fellows, before you laugh, some guys have taken things beyond low.  Let’s see, here are some of the “all star” obscene costumes… choking the chicken, morning wood, vibrator and lil’ man in the boat. But the all time tops: I once walked past a guy in the Grove dressed as a pickle grabbing contest, complete with a cardboard box with a hole cut in it… needless to say there clearly was only one pickle in that box.

Halloween has become that one time of the year where some want to live out there own live action version of “Eyes Wide Shut.” They put on the costume and use it as an excuse to do whatever. The nerdy dork dressed as Wolverine grinding on that girl in the Grove he secretly crushes on, and the girl with the pasties and cattail makes a move on the guy she sees in the library.

But then the next morning when you wake up with a pasty stuck to your forehead and a pickle grabbing costume in the corner of your dorm room, the movie goes from “Eyes Wide Shut” to “The Hangover.”

So, own up to the freak in you on All Hallows Eve… oh, and by all means put some clothes on before class the next day.

MacKenzie Green is a senior majoring in broadcast journalism and sport administration. She may be contacted at mgreen@themiamihurricane.com.

October 26, 2010

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MacKenzie Green

Contributing EDGE Writer


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