Opinion

Staff Editorial 10/25

For some students, consuming alcohol means cutting back on calories. This new dietary trend is called “drunkorexia.”

Not only is the term self-explanatory, but it also raises awareness to this growing problem among college students. Known for the practice of trading food calories for those in alcohol, “drunkorexia” is a term that often comes up in the context of eating disorders and alcohol issues.

According to The Denver Post, health counselors on college campuses have noticed a variety of issues related to eating and drinking disorders. For example, some students diet and over-exercise to prepare for partying on the weekends, and some suffer from more serious problems such as anorexia, bulimia and binge-eating disorders.

“Drunkorexia” is most common among young college women who will forgo eating all day just so they can get drunk at night. As we know, consuming alcohol on an empty stomach allows you to feel the effect of alcohol quicker. After a long night of drinking on an empty stomach, they tend to binge on junk food. After feeling guilty for devouring junk food, they will vomit. This may seem like “no big deal” to some students, but its health effects are extremely severe.

In fact, Medical Director of the Eating Recovery Center in Denver Dr. Kenneth Weiner said that anorexia nervosa has the highest death rate of any psychiatric illness.

Has our nation’s craze for being skinny led us to this? In a recent news release, The National Eating Disorders Association stated that nearly 10 million women and one million men have an eating disorder and millions more struggle with binge-eating disorder.

With these statistics in mind, we must be aware of its negative consequences. Whether it’s dieting, over-exercising or more serious disorders such as bulimia, these are not the right ways to watch our waistline. Although students know it is wrong, they continue to live this unhealthy lifestyle, not recognizing its long-term affects.

If college campuses across the nation can raise awareness about this issue, we can prevent more students from falling into the “drunkorexia” category.

Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

October 24, 2010

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

The University of Miami got off to a dream start, but could not hold on against No. 1 and defending ...

March is just around the corner; and University of Miami basketball coach Jim Larrañaga wants his pl ...

Erykah Davenport always hated being The Tall Girl. Every class picture, she was in the back row, tow ...

A little more than two years ago, Larry Scott was serving as the Miami Hurricanes’ interim head coac ...

The college basketball world woke up Friday morning to a bombshell report by Yahoo Sports detailing ...

Student a cappella group BisCaydence wins quarterfinals and advances to the next round in the intern ...

A closer look at the University of Miami's executive vice president for business and finance an ...

The popular Christian minister preached to more people than any other evangelist in history. ...

A vigil on the University of Miami campus, organized by UM students who graduated from Marjory Stone ...

The latest speaker in the popular lecture series at the Rosenstiel School, Jeff Goodell, shared insi ...

Kevin Arreaga's bronze medal in the men's weight throw led the Canes on Friday in Clemson. ...

No. 24 Miami got off to a dream start but could not hold on against No. 1 Florida Friday night, fall ...

The Hurricanes were momentarily slowed down by the first rain delay of the season, but held the Coug ...

The Miami women's basketball team plays its last game of the 2017-18 regular season Sunday at 4 ...

Canes and Eagles play at 2 p.m. Saturday in key ACC matchup. ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.