Edge

Comic book turned film

Courtesy of Lion's Gate Publicity

Does anyone ever get tired of watching the story of the gangly, voice-cracking teenage underdog turned badass? The answer is no, especially when said underdog decides to stick up for New York’s underappreciated, becomes a real-life superhero and adopts the moniker “Kick-Ass.”
Matthew Vaughn’s hilarious interpretation of Mark Millar’s comic book series of the same name, “Kick-Ass,” follows a similar vein as other contemporary blockbusters. Aaron Johnson portrays Kick-Ass’s nerdy counterpart Dave Lizewski, an average teenager with a big comic book collection and a sad inability to talk to girls, while Christopher Mintz-Plasse, also known as Fogell/McLovin’ from “Superbad,” plays the rich loner who is desperate to join in on his mob-boss father’s business.
Before you start gearing up for another stoner flick featuring teenagers that just want to get laid, keep in mind that this movie is rated R for a reason. The film’s controversial portrayal of minors doing drugs, dropping f-bombs and using weapons (bazookas included) may leave many viewers in shock. “Kick-Ass” leaves nothing to the imagination during fight sequences; blood sheds everywhere in unusually grotesque ways (human-sized microwave, anyone?).
What may be even more disturbing is Nicolas Cage’s character, Big Daddy. A crazed vigilante with a chip on his shoulder and an NRA membership, he trains (read: brainwashes) his 11-year-old daughter into becoming a knife-wielding dynamo who assumes the name “Hit Girl” in order to help fight off daddy’s enemies.
Yet, the main character himself admits that this is not the run-of-the-mill superhero movie, asking the audience, “Have you ever seen ‘Sin City?’” Human cruelty, as gruesome as it can tend to be, is not concealed or euphemized, which is probably what makes this film more believable and therefore worth watching. After all, what leads Dave to don his superhero guise to fight injustice is not radioactivity or super-strength, but his ability to be pissed off enough to do something about it.

“Kick-Ass”
Rating: 3.5/4
Released: April 16
Director: Matthew Vaughn
Starring: Aaron Johnson, Nicolas Cage, Chloe Moretz and Christopher Mintz-Plasse
Alexandra Leon may be contacted at alexandraleon@themiamihurricane.com.

April 29, 2010

Reporters

Alexandra Leon

Senior News Writer


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

He is considered among the finest defensive line coaches in the nation. And now, according to a writ ...

This is the time of year when every win or loss can make a difference in a team’s NCAA Tournament ch ...

Mike Brey doesn't pay much attention to the NBA draft stock of opposing players, but the Notre ...

He used to be a Gator. But junior Danny Reyes is plenty happy to be back home and playing for the Un ...

It’s a Wednesday morning, and one by one, the familiar Hurricane faces make their way into the non-d ...

At the University of Miami, the professor has the last word on whether students can use their laptop ...

Members of the University of Miami first response teams remind us of resources available and what to ...

Mexican activist, poet and novelist Javier Sicilia deplored the violence stemming from the “drug war ...

From the North Pole to the South Pole and everywhere in between, the art of UM alumnus Xavier Cortad ...

Walker IV scored 19, Izundu scored 14 and the Canes picked up a crucial win in South Bend. ...

The No. 25-ranked University of Miami women's golf team moved into a sixth-place tie on day two ...

After a standout first weekend at the plate with the No. 24 Hurricanes, Miami's Danny Reyes was ...

Miami women's basketball notched an impressive 77-62 triumph Sunday at Virginia, giving head co ...

Former University of Miami track and field standouts Shakima Wimbley and Tiffany Okieme were among t ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.