Opinion

Nothing but a passing fad

Political movements have greatly shaped American policy throughout the decades. The civil rights movement of the ‘60s, the feminist movement of the ‘70s and the Christian conservative movement of the ‘80s have all had lasting effects on policy.

On the other hand, an equally large number of movements, like the Free Silver movement of the late 19th century, have faded away without any long-lasting impact in Washington.

Today’s movement du jour is the Tea Party, and they are doing quite well. According to a recent NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll, more Americans have a positive view of the Tea Party movement than of either the Democratic or Republican parties.

The movement  has attracted the attention and support of notable conservative leaders like Newt Gingrich and Sarah Palin. It even managed to get Republican Scott Brown elected to Ted Kennedy’s old Senate seat. The future looks bright for the Tea Party, but one thing stands in the way of affecting long-lasting change.

The Tea Party has served as an outlet for Americans’ growing disillusionment with government and institutions in general. Tea Party protestors are united in their anger towards government, but lack a consistent message.

They blame Washington for rising deficits, but they refuse to support cuts in government programs and tax increases. Many failed political movements have aptly pointed out flaws in the government, but only the successful ones provide ideas on how to fix these problems.

The tea party movement may play an important role in shaping America’s immediate future, particularly the upcoming mid-term elections, but it must propose real solutions if it intends to be more than a passing fad.

Thomas Prieto is a senior majoring in political science. He may be contacted at tprieto@themiamihurricane.com.

March 3, 2010

Reporters

Thomas Prieto

Contributing Columnist


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

It’s the play Miami Hurricanes fans will never forget — and Florida State fans are trying to forget. ...

Miami Hurricanes fans might recall their favorite college football players in past years dreaming of ...

The new quarterback is usually the ones fans gush over. For the University of Miami, last season it ...

Debate all you want, but University of Miami football coach Mark Richt made it clearer than ever Wed ...

Last year, when University of Miami tailback Mark Walton attended the Atlantic Coast Conference Foot ...

UM dining services team earns national recognition for special event catering. ...

From hammerheads to great whites, University of Miami researcher Neil Hammerschlag is a dedicated sp ...

An ACLU report authored by UM sociologists documents racial and ethnic disparities in Miami-Dade Cou ...

Following the summit between Trump and Putin, reaction from politicians, pundits and former intellig ...

A School of Communication associate professor played an important hand—an artistic one!—in World Cup ...

Miami senior Tyler Gauthier was named to the 2018 Fall Watch List for the Rimington Trophy presented ...

Miami junior wide receiver Ahmmon Richards was among those named to the watch list for the 2018 Bile ...

University of Miami junior running back Travis Homer was named a preseason candidate for the Doak Wa ...

Six former Canes competed on NBA Summer League teams, with three averaging at least 10 points per ga ...

Quick Hits gives University of Miami volleyball fans an opportunity to get to know the new student-a ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.