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UM emerging from Andrew’s wake

ANDREW'S AFTERMATH: A duck tries to avoid getting tangled while swimming in Lake Osceola as clearing of debris began on campus. The University hired 15 contractors from around the state to repair buildings and remove downed trees.

ANDREW'S AFTERMATH: A duck tries to avoid getting tangled while swimming in Lake Osceola as clearing of debris began on campus. The University hired 15 contractors from around the state to repair buildings and remove downed trees.

By Alletta Bowers and Annette Gallagher

September 6, 1992

Hurricane Andrew’s trail of fallen power lines, smashed window panes, uprooted trees and stripped roofing tiles across the University of Miami’s four campuses and left a repair bill estimated at $11 million- and counting.

Insurance will pay some of those costs, and it is still unclear how much of the difference federal emergency funds will cover.

These early estimates have been given to the federal government, president Edward T. Foote II said.

David Lieberman, senior vice president, said the university does not intend to raise tuition because of the storm.

Most repairs will be completed by the end of the month.

The Coral Gables campus had 800 windows blown out, 35 roofs damaged and 1,000 trees lost. Some on-campus apartment buildings lost their roofs completely, but the hardest hit of all UM buildings was the Ponce Building at the corner of San Amaro Drive and Ponce de Leon Boulevard.

“The building’s going to have to be completely rebuilt on the inside,” said Victor Atherton, assistant vice president for facilities administration. “Everything got soaking wet. We went over there first thing in the morning after the storm. There was a photocopier out in the street.”

Dean Bruce Rosendahl of the Rosentiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science said the campus suffered $3.7 million to $4 million of physical damages. Time lost in writing research grant proposals could cost the school an additional $1 million in grant money- not covered by insurance.

South Campus, located near Metro Zoo, was also damaged.

“They’re going to need some roofing repairs. Building A lost all its windows as far as I could tell,” Atherton said.

Alletta Bowers wrote for The Miami Hurricane in 1992. Annette Gallagher graduated from UM in 1994 and lives in Coral Springs. She is currently an editor for Welcome to Miami and The Beaches Magazine.

subhead: Coral Gables, South campus damaged most

Hurricane Andrew’s trail of fallen power lines, smashed window panes, uprooted trees and stripped roofing tiles across the University of Miami’s four campuses left a repair bill estimated at $11 million – and counting.

Insurance will pay some of those costs, and it is still unclear how much of the difference federal emergency funds will cover.

These early estimates have been given to the federal government, President Edward T. Foote II said.

David Lieberman, senior vice president, said the University does not intend to raise tuition because of the storm.

Most repairs will be completed by the end of the month.

The Coral Gables campus had 800 windows blown out, 35 roofs damaged and 1,000 trees lost. Some on-campus apartment buildings lost their roofs completely, but the hardest hit of all UM buildings was the Ponce Building at the corner of San Amaro Drive and Ponce de Leon Boulevard.

“The building’s going to have to be completely rebuilt on the inside,” said Victor Atherton, assistant vice president for facilities administration. “Everything got soaking wet. We went over there first thing in the morning after the storm. There was a photocopier out in the street.”

Dean Bruce Rosendahl of the Rosentiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science said the RSMAS campus suffered $3.7 million to $4 million of physical damages. Time lost in writing research grant proposals could cost the school an additional $1 million in grant money – not covered by insurance.

South Campus, located near Metro Zoo, was also damaged.

“They’re going to need some roofing repairs. Building A lost all its windows as far as I could tell,” Atherton said.

Alletta Bowers wrote for The Miami Hurricane in 1992. Annette Gallagher graduated from UM in 1994 and lives in Coral Springs. She is currently an editor for Welcome to Miami and The Beaches Magazine.

December 2, 2009

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The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


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The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly on Thursdays during the regular academic year.