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RSMAS to host musical celebration of Darwin Day

Although he never met Charles Darwin in person, when Richard Milner is dressed in a long coat, rounded top hat and white beard, he might be mistaken for the father of natural selection.

Feb. 12, 2009, marked what would have been Darwin’s 200th birthday and the 150th anniversary of the publication of On the Origins Of Species.

Darwin is most noted for his impact on science with his evolutionary theory of natural selection.

However, Debra Lieberman, a professor in the department of psychology at the University of Miami, said Darwin’s principles have affected areas of human behavior that extend from psychology to economics to political science.

Milner’s highly-acclaimed one man musical show, Charles Darwin: Live and in Concert, will be performed today at 6 p.m. at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) in honor of Darwin Day.

Milner, a physical and cultural anthropologist, created a show in which he will not only be acting as Darwin the scientist, but also as Darwin the singing comedian.

At 12-years-old, Milner and his longtime friend, Stephen Jay Gould, loved animals and often went to the Bronx Zoo and to the American Museum of Natural History.

Milner stated that Darwin was always Gould’s and his biggest hero.

“If you like animals, soon you wonder where they came from and how we are related to them and you wind up at Darwin’s doorstep,” Milner said.

As he grew older, Milner’s childhood interest in Darwin never seemed to dissipate.

Now, as a renowned historian, Milner performs at colleges, museums and conferences around the world as Darwin; Thomas Henry Huxley, who is Darwin’s bulldog; Alfred Russel Wallace, known for independently proposing natural selection; and Gould, now a famous author and paleontologist.

Milner explains Darwin’s scientific impact on the world through singing songs about Darwin’s history.

“I love science and I love musical theater and I wanted to combine them. That’s my heart,” Milner said.

One of Milner’s songs, “Let Him Be First,” adds humor to the long-standing debate over who discovered natural selection first: Wallace or Darwin?

Milner said the humor he finds in Darwin does not come from his scientific books such as On the Origins of Species, but from his private and personal letters.

“It’s a real adventure to read through them. Thousands of them are already online,” he said.

Robert Ginsburg, a professor of marine geology at RSMAS and the main man in getting Milner to come to UM for Darwin Day, said Milner is extremely talented in finding a humorous side to Darwin.

“He is perceptive and clever,” Ginsburg said.

Milner added that seeing the show is a fun way to learn science and history, especially when the subject can be a bit boring.

“After all, you don’t go away humming a textbook,” he said.

Ginsburg agrees. He said the show will educationally benefit the students.

“I hope it will leave a memorable souvenir of Darwin and his associates,” he said.

February 15, 2009

Reporters

Lonnie Nemiroff

Contributing News Writer


5 COMMENTS ON THIS POST To “RSMAS to host musical celebration of Darwin Day”

  1. Perri Logan says:

    You say you want a revolution, well, you know, we all want to change the world. You tell me that it’s evolution, well, you know, we all want to change the world. Darwin changed the world and this author most certainly will as well.

  2. Arthur Avaginist says:

    I recently purchased a copy of “On The Origins of Species” and I am pleased to read a timely article on this intriguing subject of Darwinism. I only wish that I had read this sooner so that I could have seen the performance!

  3. Matthew Wolfson says:

    Agreed Alivia. I thoroughly enjoyed the reading and do feel further enlightened about the subject of Darwinism. A scientific wizard of his time and an icon in the world of science. Kudos to the wonderful journalist who put this outstanding article together!

  4. Joanna Drucker says:

    I am no longer a creationist thanks to this article!

  5. Alivia Barker says:

    This article is truly informative and enlightening. It really illuminates the entire subject of Darwinism for all to enjoy.

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