News

New Center for Computational Science may conduct “vital research”

Talk about speed; the staff at the new Center for Computational Science (CCS) can perform trillions of calculations per second as part of their effort to help researchers solve complex, real-world problems.

Tucked away in a garage at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine campus, the center is a state-of-the-art facility that blends computer power, applied mathematics and application sciences. The CCS links multiple computers to crunch complex data. For now, it is focusing on five areas: physical sciences and engineering, computational biology and bioinformatics, chemistry, data mining and visualization. The center, established in 2007, is involved in research projects on three UM campuses.

To inaugurate the center, a lecture series launched Friday afternoon at the Storer Auditorium in the School of Business. The talk was given by Daniel A. Reed, Microsoft’s scalable and multicore computing strategist who is responsible for re-envisioning the data center of the future.

“Computing is a universal intellectual amplifier which allows us to expand our memory and our ability to reason about complex events,” Reed said.

He explained that this technology helps to understand the behavior of weather and interact with friends, family and associates.

“In the modern world, in order to do science and engineering, you need to use computational methods and that they are a vital component of research and education in the new millennium,” said Nick Tsinoremas, the director of the CCS.

Tsinoremas said that since the center opened, his staff has been involved in about 85 collaborations with several schools at UM, including Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medical, and the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science.

He also said that there have been 400 people, the majority of them students, who have used the facility. Several attended Reed’s lecture last week.

Aravind Prakash, a graduate student studying computer science, said, “[Reed] is an extremely knowledgeable speaker and a person who has been through the time line of computing.”

“He has also played an active role in its evolution,” Prakash said.

Another grad student, Steven Trac, added, “I am graduating this semester and I wish that I could be around to actually use the new technology that [Reed] talked about.”

To learn more about the Center for Computational Science, please visit www.ccs.miami.edu.

November 16, 2008

Reporters

Ryan Evan Rose

Contributing News Writer


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Shakey Rodriguez, the Miami high school basketball coaching legend, vividly remembers the first time ...

It was a good day for the Miami Hurricanes basketball team. They moved up to No. 6 in the AP Top 25 ...

Erykah Davenport and Shaneese Bailey made key plays back-to-back late in the game and four players s ...

1. MARLINS: Jeter's Fish trade Gordon. Stanton next?: While others spend -- like the Angels to ...

A six-pack of Hurricanes notes on a Thursday: ▪ With the first ever early signing period just two we ...

Retired baseball star Alex Rodriguez gives "Major League" advice to UM’s fall graduating c ...

Becoming the Man of the Hour ...

Always a little bit of a flair for the dramatic. ...

A scholarship created by retired Major League Baseball star Alex Rodriguez and born out of his love ...

New Multi-State Institute Focuses on Reducing Damage from Severe Storms ...

Eighteen Hurricane student-athletes graduated from four schools and colleges at the University of Mi ...

Miami director of track and field/cross country Amy Deem's incredible career earned her a place ...

Check out the latest edition of Hurricane Magazine. ...

Members from the Miami track and field team spent the afternoon at the Boys and Girls Club in Miami ...

UM administrators, coaches and alums took part in yesterday's allCanes Holiday Shopping Spree f ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.