Sports

KEYS TO THE GAME:: Miami v. BC

Miami

What went right?

Not a whole lot. James Dews continues to play well after scoring a career-high 20 points against Georgia Tech, and he has consistently scored in double-figures all season. Miami should have looked for Dews more in the first half as he was the only player with the hot hand.

What went wrong?

Miami got off to a slow start on the road and was unable to cut into the looming deficit before halftime. Miami is not a team that can just turn on the switch like they did against Georgia Tech. The game was not nearly as close as the score indicated.

Brian Asbury and Anthony King combined for two points. Miami cannot afford to have that kind of production from two starters in ACC games. Asbury continues to be inconsistent from game to game while King’s offensive performance has not taken off as expected.

Jack McClinton struggled with his shot for the second straight game, despite going on a run late in the contest. McClinton did not look comfortable running the offense in transition and was unable to convert shots near the basket.

Miami needs improved play at point guard. The Hurricanes had just seven assists while Boston College dished out 19. Miami’s guards have not shown they can penetrate and open up shots for their teammates.

Miami’s cold shooting continued. The Hurricanes continue to rely on shooting the 3-point ball in the halfcourt set. Miami has not established that they are an inside-outside team in any way.

Boston College

What went wrong?

Not much. Tyrese Rice was just 4-for-16 from the game and the Eagles still had their way. Al Skinner must be pleased with his team’s 3-0 start in the ACC.

What went right?

Boston College started the game fast and never looked back. The Eagles played with high energy and defended well. The bench contributed more than expected and the frontline played better than Miami’s.

The Eagles proved they can win without relying on Tyrese Rice to shoulder the load. The supporting cast of Rakim Sanders and Sharmari Spears stepped up in a big way.

Boston College may have lost Jared Dudley inside, but they still have players that can make an impact. Tyrelle Blair owned the paint and was physical, recording 12 rebounds and five blocked shots. Miami’s frontline was no match in this game.

Alex Kushel may be contacted at a.kushel@umiami.edu.

January 17, 2008

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The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


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The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.