Orange Bowl and Dolphin Stadium Side-by-side

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ORANGE BOWL FACTS

 The Orange Bowl was dedicated on Dec. 10, 1937
 The University of Miami lost 26-0 in its first game there against University of Georgia
 The Orange Bowl was originally named after one of Miami’s oldest pioneers, Roddy Burdine, until 1959
 In 1944, stands were added at both end zones to bring the capacity from 23,330 to 35,030
 Expansions in 1950, 1953 and 1957 included double-decking
 The Orange Bowl, or “OB,” now holds a maximum of 72,319 people
 Players run across the OB’s Prescription Athletic Turf, a transition in 1977 from artificial turf
 The field runs from East to West
 The largest game that ever took place at the Orange Bowl was in 1995 when 81,753 fans watched the Nebraska Cornhuskers defeat the Miami Hurricanes 24-17 in the Orange Bowl Classic
 The largest professional game ever to take place at the OB counted 80,187 attendees on Jan. 18, 1976 as the Pittsburgh Steelers defeated the Dallas Cowboys 21-17 in Super Bowl X
 The fifth floor level of the OB can hold 92 writers plus scoreboard, public address and technical crews
 The fourth and sixth floors consist of VIP seating and hospitality areas
 The Orange Bowl was the site of Olympic soccer from July 20-28 1996
 It has hosted eleven national title games since the induction date of 1970
 It has hosted five Super Bowls, the most recent being when the Pittsburgh Steelers defeated the Dallas Cowboys 35-31 in Super Bowl XIII
 By the 1996 season, when the Orange Bowl Classic was moved to Dolphin Stadium, the stadium had hosted eight of the last 13 national championships, including Miami’s wins in 1983, 1987 and 1991
 The Orange Bowl is also home to “Wide Right I, II and III” and “Wide Left” in games when the rival Florida State Seminoles lost to the ‘Canes
 There are approximately 3,146 parking spaces in the OB

Information compiled by Contributing Sports Writer Christina De Nicola from Hurricanesports.com.

DOLPHIN STADIUM FACTS

 The Stadium is located in Miami Gardens about 21 miles from the University’s Coral Gables campus
 There are approximately 14,000 parking spaces at Dolphin Stadium
 It has four 103-inch plasma displays, one of the world’s largest plasma TVs
 It has over 1,600 TV monitors
 It has all-new LED ribbon score board
 The stadium has been home to the Miami Dolphins since 1987 and to the Florida Marlins since 1993
 Dolphin Stadium has hosted four Super Bowls (1989, 1995, 1999, 2007) and two World Series (1997, 2003)
 Dolphin Stadium will host Super Bowl XLIV in 2010
 Dolphin Stadium has a maximum seating capacity of 78,000 people, with an average of 36,500 for baseball and 76,500 for football
 Dolphin Stadium had many previous names, including Joe Robbie Stadium, Pro Player Park, Pro Player Stadium and Dolphins Stadium
 When the stadium changed its name from Joe Robbie Stadium to Pro Player Park, many Miamians protested, including sportscaster Hank Goldberg who referred to it as “The Stadium Formerly Known as Joe Robbie” in protest
 Dolphin Stadium was the first NFL stadium financed by private funds. The inclusion of a Club Level and Executive Suites with modern amenities helped pay for its construction
 The stadium was designed to have a wider playing field in order to accommodate soccer and a potential South Florida Major League Baseball franchise. Consequently, the first row of seats is 90 feet from the sideline in a football configuration (the average distance is 50 feet)
 Since 1991, when South Florida was awarded a National League expansion franchise, the stadium has received $100 million in upgrades and renovations
 The 33-foot tall left field fence, nicknamed the “Teal Tower,” inhibits the ability of baseball players to hit homeruns.
 Football, lacrosse, soccer and baseball are all currently played at Dolphin Stadium, but in 2010 the Marlins will be contractually obligated to leave

Information compiled by Kelly Herson from hurricanesports.com and answers.com/topics/dolphin-stadium.

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