News Briefs


New center at School of Engineering focuses on safety

The University of Miami College of Engineering is now home to the University Cooperative Research Center for Repair of Buildings and Bridges with Composites. The center is funded by the National Science Foundation, an independent government agency that promotes research and education in non-medical.

The center, housed in the Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering Department, will focus on rehabilitating and strengthening existing structures in South Florida.

“Miami is an ideal location for a researcher interested in constructed facilities because the tropical weather puts a lot of demand on our structures,” said Antonio Nanni, professor and chair of the UM Department of Civil, Architecture and Environmental Engineering. “The high temperatures, salty air and humidity have degrading effects on the materials we use to construct our buildings and bridges.”

Professor receives prestigious award

Robert Quencer, professor and chairman of the Department of Radiology at the Miller School of Medicine, has been selected to receive the Gold Medal from the American Society of Neuroradiology (ASN). The ASN is made up of 3,000 physicians, and the Gold Medal is awarded to a researcher who has made exceptional contributions to the field of neuroradiology, while maintaining the ASN mission of promoting research, clinical practice and education in neuroradiology.

Budget cuts in store for Medical School

Republicans in the Florida State House of Representatives are proposing a tuition increase of 5 percent for university and community college students. The intended budget includes a $3 million cut in funding for the University of Miami School of Medicine, but a $5.47 million budget plan for a medical school at Florida International University. State representatives claim that the money is available based on a promise made by lawmakers to the Board of Governors.


‘Cure’ for fetal sexual orientation stirs controversy

Kristine Breithaupt // The Daily Reveille (LSU)

(U-WIRE) BATON ROUGE – As genetic sciences advance, the possibility of mapping an unborn baby’s eye color, height and possible genetic health problems moves closer.

But with scientific possibilities come new ethical questions to consider. Recent debates have increased over the possibility of isolating a gene related to homosexuality. Some have argued that if such a gene can be isolated, expecting parents should be informed so they can possibly change their child’s sexual orientation.

Some say such practices are unethical and should be prohibited. But others say identifying someone’s sexual orientation by their DNA is not possible.

Albert Mohler, president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, recently posted in a blog that he hopes homosexual genes can be isolated and reversed.

“If a biological basis is found, and if a prenatal test is then developed, and if a successful treatment to reverse the sexual orientation to heterosexual is ever developed, [Baptists] would support its use as we should unapologetically support the use of any appropriate means to avoid sexual temptation and the inevitable effects of sin,” Mohler wrote in his blog.

Mohler’s views have raised eyebrows of many gay activists. Malcolm Lazin, executive director of the Equality Forum, a GLBT civil rights organization, responded March 14 in a news release.

“Fetal invasion to alter sexual orientation is reminiscent of the Nazis,” Lazin said. “It reflects a theocratic and Taliban-like plan that should frighten all Americans.”

After receiving a slew of critical e-mails, Mohler posted an update denying that he ever suggested using genetic therapies to make “corrected babies.”


The 2006 Ibis Yearbook recieved its second Gold Crown Award at the Columbia Scholastic Press Association Awards Convocation on Mar. 17. The yearbook was judged on design, writing/edition, concept, photography, art and graphics. The 2006 Ibis Yearbook is also one of 13 finalists for the Associated Press Association Yearbook Pacemaker, a prestigious award presented to university and college publications.

Compiled by Karyn Meshbane

March 27, 2007


The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami

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The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.