Opinion

The verdict on the candidates’ plans for education: no change

Call me a pessimist, but I don’t think anything will change. President Bush has a plan, according to his website, “to ensure that every high school student graduates and is ready for the workplace or college” by earmarking hundreds of millions to education for the next fiscal year. Pell Grants, of which I am a recipient, will increase a whopping $400 by 2005. His plan would like to see an increase in overall financial aid for all students, including loans.

According to the New York Times, Pell Grants 25 years ago covered 80 percent of public school aid. Today it covers 40 percent. For me at UM it covers a little over 10 percent. Another part of his plan is to make college more affordable by reducing interest rates, increasing loan limits and expanding repayment options. This does not sound right to me. If you extend the life of your loan with a lower interest rate and pay less in monthly installments, doesn’t that come out to be about the same as it was before?

If you think Kerry is better, think again. He wants to “offer a fully refundable College Opportunity Tax credit on up to $4,000 of tuition for every year of college and offer aid to states that keep tuitions down,” according to his website. How about just giving me that money in the form of a grant? What if the state has to increase the costs to take care of a system that may need to be upgraded which can lead to a tuition increase? What would Kerry do then?

These “improvements” all sound good to those that want to hear it, but where is the money going to come from to pay for all of this “goodwill” for students? In case you haven’t heard, there is a little country called Iraq we need to take care of, and it is siphoning money from taxpayers like a baby sucking on a bottle. We also experienced a few hurricanes over the past few months, and you know it costs a pretty penny to cover those damages.

In other words, when it comes to education, be prepared for absolutely no change in the next four years.

Vontilla Steven can be contacted at v.steven@umiami.edu.

September 30, 2004

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

From the onset, the Miami Hurricanes' plan was for the Carol Soffer football indoor practice fa ...

Gino DiMare on Tuesday stood in a spot that two men before him had crafted into a pinnacle of succes ...

The NBA Draft is on Thursday, and the buzz around the league is that the University of Miami’s Lonni ...

Former NFL and University of Miami star Kellen Winslow Jr. was arrested Thursday for numerous allege ...

Trevor Darling's perseverance paid off. After not being selected in the NFL Draft, the former U ...

Teachers tackle challenging questions at the Holocaust Studies Summer Institute. ...

A University of Miami lecturer explores the role of the front porch in black communities. ...

In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, two public health sciences students traveled to Puerto Rico to ...

Colder Atlantic temperatures could change hurricane season forecasts, but the trend isn't expec ...

UM neurorehabilitation expert David S. Kushner, M.D., who helps modern patients recover from brain s ...

Gino DiMare was officially introduced as the 10th head baseball coach in program history Tuesday in ...

Jaquan Johnson was named to Athlon Sports' Preseason All-America First Team, while Shaq Quarter ...

An outstanding showing at the USATF Championships earned Symone Mason a trip to the World U20 Champi ...

UM alum returns to lead Canes' MBB strength and conditioning efforts. ...

Amy Deem was recognized for the third time as the ACC Women's Outdoor Track and Field Coach of ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.