Opinion

The fine line between piety and religious propaganda

Election years are undoubtedly stressful. As potential voters, we are bombarded with conflicting information and are expected to make a sound decision. How can we dig through the massive biases to find truth and be informed enough to make a decision? How do we figure out truly what we agree with or not? How do we know that we have not been presented with only half of the issues?

One issue, of the many that particularly disturbs me is the way that religion has become a political issue.

Morality is important and valuable in any society, but religion is not an official part of our government, as established by the Constitution and Bill of Rights. I wonder, then, why have Jesus Christ’s beliefs become something for everyone to consider when choosing our next president?

I went to church on Sunday and directly in front me someone’s shirt read, “Is Christ ‘OK’ with abortion?” Please understand that I am not criticizing religious people and those who pray for guidance when making decisions – I am one of them.

My concern is with bringing Jesus in as a vital perspective and how we should be guilt-ridden if we do not think of his words. I am also troubled with how we only think of Jesus and consider what he has to say only when it seems convenient. If we are talking about his opinion on abortion, then what he says about any form of murder should also be considered, whether it is punitive, the act of war, or capital punishment.

Religious fundamentalism prevalent in this election does not make sense to me even when viewed through my faith. Many issues in this election have been tied to religious thought such as abortion, the war and gay and lesbian marriages. I’m shocked that those considering themselves faithful and vehemently against the murder of unborn children are turning their backs sharply on what their faith has to say about loving, accepting, respecting and forgiving all human beings and human life.

So, I say we stray from discussing these issues in a religious light and instead focus on the society at large and how it should be improved for the people, by the people.

Beni Yunis can be contacted at b.yunis@umiami.edu.

September 30, 2004

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Hurricanes fans, get out your pencils, calendars and a list of your favorite hotels. The Atlantic Co ...

Three former Miami Hurricanes — defensive lineman Chad Thomas, offensive lineman KC McDermott and de ...

In all technicality, the Orange Bowl is a postseason, neutral-site bowl game that includes a top tea ...

When it comes to recruiting, the scariest sentence for Miami Hurricanes fans is this one: Nesta Silv ...

This time, there was no miracle Miami win over Duke. The fifth-ranked Blue Devils rallied from a 13- ...

As artificial Intelligence takes hold, tech visionary David Kenny stresses keeping human values in t ...

UM’s First Black Graduates Project committee visits an iconic D.C. museum for inspiration to create ...

The Beaux Arts Festival of Art debuts at a new site with picture-perfect weather and a panoply of or ...

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s vision for a “Beloved Community” has inspired a number of University of ...

UM launches three cyber security certificate programs to equip professionals for the growing employm ...

The University of Miami released its 2018 football schedule Wednesday, highlighted by a nationally t ...

Notes from Miami's 2018 Football schedule. ...

Freshman jumper Hasani Knight was named ACC Men's Field Performer of the Week. ...

MIami volleyball signee Chloe Brown was named the 2017-18 Gatorade Oregon Volleyball Player of the Y ...

The University of Miami women's basketball team will play the first of two home games in a 31-d ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.