News

Ex-reporter shares experience of Taliban capture with students

Yvonne Ridley, a former chief reporter for the British Sunday Express who was captured for 10 days by the Taliban while undercover in Afghanistan in 2001, recently spoke at UM as part of Islamic Awareness Month.
Ridley said her experiences caused her to become an outspoken critic of the war on terror.
She described how news stories were artificially dramatized because no journalists were ever allowed near enough to the fighting to really see what was happening.
“Some television reporters would pay Afghanis five dollars to shoot their guns close by while the camera rolled,” Ridley said. “Those dramatic, uplifting images you saw of ‘liberated’ Afghanis celebrating after the war were a result of much needed dollars.”
“Some television reporters would pay Afghanis $5 to shoot their guns close by while the camera rolled. Those dramatic, uplifting images you saw… were a result of much needed dollars.” -YVONNE RIDLEY
She also recounted her realization that American and British bombing raids seemed to be at innocent targets.
While held as a captive of the Taliban, she said that she was treated with “courtesy and respect,” even though President Bush has called it the most evil, brutal regime in the world.
“They say that the truth is often the first casualty of war and in Iraq, it’s still in intensive care,” Ridley said.
Sponsoring organizations included the Council of American-Islamic Relations, Islamic Foundation of South Florida, International Muslims at Nova Southeastern University, and the Islamic Society of UM.

Reeva Oza can be contacted at r.oza@umiami.edu.

FACTS ON THE TALIBAN
In 1994, began to emerge as a viable political force, vowing to restore order and enforce strict Islamic law.

Took power in 1996 and imposed harsh Islamic system of law on citizens of Afghanistan.

Banished women from the work force.

Closed schools to girls in cities and expelled women from universities.

Prohibited women from leaving their homes unless accompanied by a close male relative.

March 30, 2004

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Either the Miami Hurricanes get a collective adrenaline rush from heart-palpitating fourth quarters, ...

University of Miami men’s basketball coach Jim Larrañaga, his face showing the strain of an ongoing ...

The No. 8 Hurricanes,  20 1/2-point favorites over next opponent North Carolina, are still one of on ...

Kudos to the two newest Atlantic Coast Conference Players of the Week: tight end Christopher Herndon ...

Mark Richt is not overly concerned with depth. Not when the eighth-ranked Miami Hurricanes (6-0, 4-0 ...

A University of Miami Ph.D. student in the Department of History sheds light on the dark history of ...

Univeristy of Miami’s Wynwood Art Gallery holds its annual faculty exhibition featuring thought-prov ...

From a game simulating how whales navigate to a tribute to Ella Fitzgerald, the U showcased some of ...

A new mobile game called Blues and Reds, now available worldwide, aims to help researchers study int ...

A major Lancet Commission report, a three-year project headed by UM’s Professor Felicia Knaul and co ...

The Hurricanes may be young, but they have the talent and poise to make a deep run in March. ...

Miami tight end Christopher Herndon and linebacker Michael Pinckney were among those recognized with ...

As a Hurricane Club member, you are invited to participate in the 25th Annual University of Miami Ha ...

The Miami women's tennis team wrapped up play Sunday the ITA Southeast Regional Championships P ...

The Hurricanes grabbed four interceptions and another ACC victory as they defeated Syracuse, 27-19, ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.