Opinion

The buck stops here, out of touch with reality

Do you want to pay money to be miserable? As obvious as the answer may seem, so many students do it everyday–they waste thousands of dollars on classes that they hate, and numerous hours studying extensively, to receive a failing grade each time.
The most miserable students I meet seem to be in some science-related field. Most don’t even crack a smile when they talk about it–if they talk about it. Then I meet pre-law students stressed about their grades to get into law school, and for what? Are these students passionate about organic chemistry or analyzing government?
No, they want to make a quick buck or two when they get out of college. Then they may settle down with something fun later on.
But four to ten years of miserable education never ignited any true talents and interest within them. And they need the miserable job to pay off those student loans. Wait, that new condo isn’t paid for, so maybe they’ll end up keeping the miserable job anyway, plus they’ll need money for retirement. Unfortunately, they reach the end of their lives and realize they never accomplished anything fulfilling, except their wallets.
The other greatest excuses I hear for majoring in something miserable is that “my parents made me” or “my parents are paying for only that.” A sad life they lead, considering their parents aren’t the ones taking those horrible classes and aren’t the ones ending up in therapy after they have a mental breakdown.
I love those students who sneer at the English majors, the fiction wrings hopefuls and the artist-to-be, knowing the chance of living the ideal comfortable lifestyle are improbable in those professions. But I also will love to see those same students 20 years from now envying the art majors because their hearts are in their work.
If students think they can cover up their emptiness and misery with full pockets in the end, maybe they will find more comfort spending their college tuition on self-improvement, and investing in a therapist.
Devotion to the buck makes a tragic ending, unless of course will be able to buy another life in the future.

Marquita K. Bell is a sophomore majoring in Print Journalism and Political Science.

February 11, 2003

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The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


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The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.