Opinion

Letter to the Editor

The editorial from the Sept. 17 edition of The Miami Hurricane spelled out the writer’s belief that war with Iraq cannot be justified. What is most telling about this editorial is that it seems as much about a war that can’t be justified as it is about the writer’s personal dislike for George W. Bush. As if to highlight this point, the editorial ran next to an anti-Bush political cartoon which at best can only be described as uncreative while at the same time lacking in any informative value.

For eleven years the government of Iraq (i.e. Saddam Hussein) has not lived up to any of the treaty stipulations leading to a formal end to the Gulf War; stipulations to which it agreed and was a signatory. This fact alone is sufficient justification for the introduction of military forces to “guarantee” that government’s future cooperation. After all, they lost the war. The defeated do not have the luxury of deciding which conditions imposed upon them by the victor they will follow and which they will disregard. The last time defiance of this sort reared its head it was not confronted. As a result, the world was left with nearly thirty million dead.

While it is true that President Bush has made no secret of his desire to remove Saddam Hussein from power, it is because, like the continued endurance of Fidel Castro, there can be no progress on Iraq while the Ba’ath party remains in power. Hussein was not removed in 1991 because of the very same multilateralism that the editorial supports by implication. Additionally, while it is true that the economy is having problems, it is both self-centered and narcissistic to proclaim that only the Great Depression was worse; clearly, the recession that propelled Bill Clinton into office made for far worse economic conditions than what we see today.

Distrusting your government is a good thing. In contrast, distrusting your government while relying on the “honorable” motives of Tariq Aziz and Saddam Hussein is not. This kind of thinking is naive – on a scale of Chamberlainian proportions.

Scott Wacholtz is a junior majoring in computer science and political science who served as a Marine Corp Sergeant in Desert Storm.

September 27, 2002

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Either the Miami Hurricanes get a collective adrenaline rush from heart-palpitating fourth quarters, ...

Mark Richt is not overly concerned with depth. Not when the eighth-ranked Miami Hurricanes (6-0, 4-0 ...

After jumping three spots from No. 10 to No. 7 last week in the Amway Coaches Poll (one spot better ...

University of Miami weak-side linebacker Michael Pinckney is definitely old-school Miami Hurricane. ...

The question came straight at Ahmmon Richards, like a tight spiral. And this time, he was locked in. ...

Univeristy of Miami’s Wynwood Art Gallery holds its annual faculty exhibition featuring thought-prov ...

From a game simulating how whales navigate to a tribute to Ella Fitzgerald, the U showcased some of ...

A new mobile game called Blues and Reds, now available worldwide, aims to help researchers study int ...

A major Lancet Commission report, a three-year project headed by UM’s Professor Felicia Knaul and co ...

With a $6.8 million NIH grant, the UM School of Nursing and Health Studies and FIU Robert Stempel Co ...

The Hurricanes grabbed four interceptions and another ACC victory as they defeated Syracuse, 27-19, ...

The Miami women's tennis team wrapped up play Sunday the ITA Southeast Regional Championships P ...

As a Hurricane Club member, you are invited to participate in the 25th Annual University of Miami Ha ...

Kolby Bird had a career-high 21 kills, but the Hurricanes dropped a five-set battle to Notre Dame on ...

The Miami soccer team recognized its four seniors Sunday afternoon and then dropped a hard-fought 2- ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.